“I shall be an autocrat: that’s my trade”

Following the news about Russian political life these days – notably in the aftermath of the poisoning of opposition figure Alexey Navalny – one might think that this quote comes from President Vladimir Putin. But it would be wrong to assume that. These words were pronounced by none other than Catherine the Great.

In his brilliant and insightful book A Short History of Russia: How the World’s Largest Country Invented Itself, from the Pagans to Putin, Professor Mark Galeotti chronicles the historical continuity – and I could add ingenuity – of power in the land of the double-headed eagle. During his reign (980-1015), Vladimir the Great took “[…] the Rus’ beyond their Viking roots”, made a show of piety that “[…] was actually a piece of ruthless statecraft.” If that sounds familiar with today’s operating mode, that’s “[…] because one can draw a direct and often-bloody line between these times and the present day. The origin story, in which vulnerability is spun as agency, sets the tone, especially as this is not simply a story of weakness, but of embracing conquest and creating something new from it.”

Ever since, Russian leaders have proven pragmatic and ruthless in crafting power. To remain at the top, Russian stateswomen and statesmen had to thwart the power and influence of indocile aristocrats, because a strong state requires subjecting real and potential opposition to undivided authority. Those considering Vladimir Putin to be a scandalous anomaly should consider the fact that Peter the Great “[…] had his eldest son tortured under suspicion of plotting against him, a torment from which he died.” Or that the great Catherine was complicit in the assassination of her husband-tsar to ascend to the throne.

Not that I condone violence, poisoning and assassinations – far from it.

But past leaders who did not abide by the rule that power is acquired and kept at all cost – sometimes at the price of violence – did not last. Soviet leaders Nikita Khrushchev and Mikhail Gorbachev were excellent cases in point. Before them, tsar Nicholas II impotently saw power escape from his hands because of his lack of political skills.

Vladimir Putin, of whom many say that he is a keen student of history, certainly keeps this storyline close to mind. Western governments can draft protests condemnations, launch inquiries and express the most eloquent outrage. Alas for them, they have little to say in who occupies the Kremlin. The day he loses his grip on power and the forced docility of current-day boyars will be the last of his reign. One can and should feel sorry for what happened to Alexey Navalny. Making a political opponent suffer physically – and potentially die – is something I guess I will never be able to understand. At the same time, the trends of Russian history are much larger than the evolution of our current values. Mr. Navalny is not the first nemesis of the throne to be tossed aside in the land of the tsars. And my guess is he won’t be the last either. I imagine that few tsars and successors departed this world with a conscience clean of such lethal political maneuvers.

All in all, those who seek to better understand the nature and demands of power in Russian politics should grab a copy of Mark Galeotti’s latest book and embark on the journey of understanding why Vladimir Putin acts the way he does. “Much is known about Peter [the Great]; much less is truly understood”, writes the author. The same applies to the current defender of the double-headed eagle. You may dislike him and what he does, but that does not diminish the urgent need to better understand the sources of Russian power.

At the stylistic level, Pr. Galeotti has an acknowledged quality offering the reader a simplified version of the intricacies of names and events – where other authors could simply bore the reader. He writes in a way that requires being peeled away from his book in order to attend to other tasks. I will await with great eagerness his next book.

________________

Mark Galeotti, A Short History of Russia: How the World’s Largest Country Invented Itself, from the Pagans to Putin, Toronto, Hanover Square Press, 2020, 224 pages.

I would like to express all my gratitude to Emer Flounders, from HarperCollins, who provided me with a review copy of this excellent book and who is always more than generous and helpful whenever I need some assistance about a title published by this fantastic publishing house.

Putin and Israel

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (Source: Ynetnews)

(version française)

There are lots of historic and major diplomatic announcements between Israel and Arab countries (UAE and Bahrain) these days, a development in which the United States are directly associated. In the last couple of years, we have observed the existence of another well-frequented diplomatic channel between Moscow and Jerusalem and I was very glad when acclaimed author Professor Mark Galeotti – author of an excellent biography of Vladimir Putin and more recently of A Short History of Russia – accepted to respond to a few questions about the subject a few weeks ago. Here is the content of our exchange.

Putin tends to respond well to tough interlocutors.

Do you think the election of pro-Russian Ariel Sharon as Prime Minister in 2001 played a role in President Putin’s stance about Israel?

I think it certainly helped in that Putin tends to respond well to tough interlocutors.

Israel is in many ways a Russian ally, despite some inevitable points of contention […].

Judging by the number of meetings between Prime Minister Netanyahu and President Putin (10 visits by Benjamin Netanyahu in Moscow since 2013 and 2 visits by Vladimir Putin in Israel since 2012), one could think that there is a notable rapprochement between Moscow and Jerusalem. How important is this relationship for the Russian president?

It’s important for both Putin and Russia. Israel is in many ways a Russian ally, despite some inevitable points of contention – when the IAF bombs Hezbollah positions in Syria, for example, the Russian air defense system there is not activated and clearly they have been forewarned. Likewise, Russia at times shares intelligence with Israel about Iran.

How important are the Middle East issues in Russian domestic politics? Is there a link between Russian domestic politics and President Putin’s relationship with Israel?

Honestly, it’s not really a factor – neither a plus, nor a minus.

Some observers are of the opinion that Israel is just a pawn on Russia’s chessboard. Could Russia become a key strategic ally of Israel in the near future?

That gives Israel too little credit. Yes, it has good relations with Russia (the first drones the Russians fielded were bought from Israel, for example), but it is not going to be anyone’s pawn.

Putin sends the signal that anti-Semitism is not acceptable.

You mention it briefly in your book (on page 75), when you mention that President Putin demonstrates “[…] no hint of anti-Semitism”, but could you tell us more about where he stands on the issue and what he does to confront this trend?

One can’t say that he has especially actively fought against it, but his evidently good relations with Israel and also the Chief Rabbi of Moscow are certainly powerful symbols to powerful and ambitious Russians that anti-Semitism is not acceptable.

Compared to the trend observable in other East European countries (like Poland for example), what is the current status of anti-Semitism in Russia?

It’s present, of course, but subjectively it feels in decline – in the 1990s one could often see anti-Semitic graffiti on the walls or slurs in the media, but both are much less evident today. In some ways an interesting development is that the extreme nationalists, from whom one might expect some prejudice, actually express respect for Israel in terms of its willingness to stand up for its own interests, with force if need be.

Apart from the President and the Prime Minister, who are the engineers of the relationship between the two countries? Is there any track II diplomacy involved in your opinion?

Pinchas Goldschmidt, the Chief Rabbi of Moscow, has been a very significant player in this respect – and, of course, there are many oligarchs and minigarchs of Jewish origins and often dual Russian-Israeli citizenship who act as connectors.

__________________

(version française)

Poutine et Israël

On assiste ces jours-ci à plusieurs annonces diplomatiques historiques et majeures entre Israël et des pays arabes (les Émirats arabes unis et le Bahreïn), un développement auquel les États-Unis sont directement associés. Dans les dernières années, nous avons observé l’existence d’un autre canal diplomatique très fréquenté entre Moscou et Jérusalem et j’étais très heureux que le Professeur Mark Galeotti – auteur réputé d’une excellente biographie de Vladimir Poutine et plus récemment du livre A Short History of Russia – accepte de répondre à quelques questions à ce sujet il y a quelques semaines. Voici le contenu de cet échange.

Poutine a tendance à bien réagir face à des interlocuteurs coriaces.

Pensez-vous que l’élection d’Ariel Sharon, qui était notoirement pro-russe, au poste de Premier ministre en 2001 a joué un rôle dans la position du président Poutine sur Israël?

Je pense que cela a certainement aidé, dans la mesure où Poutine a tendance à bien réagir face à des interlocuteurs coriaces.

Israël est, à bien des égards, un allié de la Russie, et ce, malgré certains points de frictions inévitables.

À en juger par le nombre de rencontres entre le Premier ministre Netanyahu et le président Poutine (10 visites de Benjamin Netanyahu à Moscou depuis 2013 et 2 visites de Vladimir Poutine en Israël depuis 2012), on pourrait penser qu’il y a un rapprochement notable entre Moscou et Jérusalem. Quelle est l’importance de cette relation pour le président russe?

C’est important pour Poutine et pour la Russie. Israël est, à bien des égards, un allié de la Russie, et ce, malgré certains points de frictions inévitables. Par exemple, lorsque l’IAF (les forces aériennes israéliennes) bombarde les positions du Hezbollah en Syrie, le système de défense aérienne russe n’est pas activé et les Russes ont clairement été prévenus. De même, la Russie partage parfois des renseignements avec Israël au sujet de l’Iran.

Quelle est l’importance des questions moyen-orientales dans la politique intérieure russe? Existe-t-il un lien entre la politique intérieure russe et les relations du président Poutine avec Israël?

Honnêtement, ce n’est pas vraiment un facteur – ce n’est ni un avantage, ni un inconvénient.

Certains observateurs estiment qu’Israël n’est qu’un pion sur l’échiquier russe. La Russie pourrait-elle devenir un allié stratégique clé d’Israël dans un avenir prochain?

Ce serait accorder trop peu de crédit à Israël. Oui, ce pays entretient de bonnes relations avec la Russie (les premiers drones russes qui sont entrés en fonction avaient été achetés en Israël, par exemple), mais Jérusalem ne deviendra le pion de personne.

Vous mentionnez brièvement, à la page 75 de votre livre, que le président Poutine ne manifeste « […] pas une once d’antisémitisme », mais pourriez-vous nous en dire davantage à propos de sa position sur le sujet et ce qu’il fait pour lutter contre ce fléau?

Poutine envoie le message que l’antisémitisme est inacceptable.

On ne peut pas dire qu’il l’a particulièrement activement combattu, mais ses relations manifestement bonnes avec Israël et avec le grand rabbin de Moscou sont certainement des symboles puissants pour les Russes influents et ambitieux à l’effet que l’antisémitisme est inacceptable.

Par rapport à la tendance observable dans d’autres pays d’Europe de l’Est (comme la Pologne par exemple), quel est l’état actuel de l’antisémitisme en Russie?

Le phénomène est présent, bien sûr, mais subjectivement, il semble en déclin – dans les années 1990, on pouvait souvent voir des graffitis antisémites sur les murs ou des insultes proférées dans les médias, mais les deux manifestations sont beaucoup moins évidentes aujourd’hui. À certains égards, une évolution intéressante est observable à l’effet que les nationalistes extrémistes, de qui on peut s’attendre à des préjugés, expriment en fait leur respect pour Israël, au niveau de sa volonté de défendre ses propres intérêts, avec force si nécessaire.

À part le président et le premier ministre, qui sont les architectes des relations entre les deux pays? À votre avis, y a-t-il une diplomatie parallèle à l’œuvre?

Pinchas Goldschmidt, le grand rabbin de Moscou, a été un acteur très important à cet égard – et, bien sûr, il existe de nombreux oligarques et minigarques d’origine juive et souvent détenteurs de la double nationalité russo-israélienne qui agissent comme entremetteurs.

FDR was a role model for Vladimir Putin

PutinFDR

LA VERSION FRANÇAISE SUIT

After reading his insightful, well-written and gripping book about President Vladimir Putin, I asked Professor Mark Galeotti if he would accept to answer a few questions for this blog. He swiftly agreed and I’m very grateful for the generosity of his time. Here is the content of our exchange.

Many sincere thanks Pr. Galeotti for accepting to respond to a few questions for my blog.

His very privacy means we all get to imagine our own personal Putin…

PutinMarkGaleottiOn page 22 of your excellent book about President Putin, you write “If people think you are powerful, you are powerful.” On page 53, you refer to “purposeful theatricality”. In your book, Putin doesn’t come across as a bad person. Is there an important difference between the public and private persona of the Russian President? How is Mr. Putin different in private than what he shows in public?

The thing is that we really have very little sense of the true private self of Vladimir Putin: he absolutely protects that side of his life, and instead what we see is a guarded and carefully managed public persona. I think that for all the opulence of his lifestyle – the palaces, the personal staff, the thousand-dollar tracksuits – he is actually something of a lonely and distant figure, now almost trapped within the public persona, but this is very much my own imagining. In a way, that’s the point: his very privacy means we all get to imagine our own personal Putin…

On page 75, you debunk the notion that Vladimir Putin is some kind of social conservative (he notably upholds abortion rights), arguing that he is a pragmatist first. This notion is unfortunately not widely known in the West. Why do you think observers and commentators still hold to the notion that he is some kind of conservative ideologue?

Continue reading “FDR was a role model for Vladimir Putin”

Vladimir Poutine, ce méconnu

PutinMarkGaleottiNe cherchez pas à savoir pourquoi, mais la fête de Pâques me fait toujours penser à la Russie. J’ignore d’où ça vient, mais c’est comme ça.

Il est donc à propos que je publie quelque chose à propos de ce pays en cette fin de semaine pascale.

On le sait, Vladimir Poutine flotte dans une aura de mystère et d’incompréhension. Homme le plus dangereux du monde pour les uns, objet de curiosité pour plusieurs ou figure inspirante pour les autres, celui qui est aux commandes de la Russie depuis 20 ans laisse peu de gens indifférents. Et ça lui fait probablement bien plaisir, puisque son positionnement médiatique enviable est proportionnel à l’influence qu’il souhaite son pays voir occuper sur la scène internationale.

Le personnage me fascine depuis longtemps et je suis toujours à la recherche de bonnes lectures pour mieux le connaître – au-delà des attaques en règle ou de l’hagiographie.

Le portrait que brosse Mark Galeotti du président russe dans We Need to Talk About Putin : How the West gets Him Wrong mérite assurément de faire partie des lectures incontournables à propos de ce chef d’État.

Selon l’auteur, les malentendus dans nos relations avec la Russie découleraient de notre incompréhension de celui qui la dirige. D’où la nécessité de mieux en comprendre les ressorts.

Acteur politique rationnel, Poutine serait d’abord et avant tout un pragmatique désireux de faire en sorte que la Russie soit respectée sur la scène internationale. Fondamentalement loyal, le dirigeant n’aimerait pas prendre de risques (l’épisode ukrainien serait une erreur de parcours découlant de mauvais conseils selon l’historien britannique) et ne serait pas un idéologue. Il dérogerait également aux normes de plusieurs Russes de sa génération, en épousant une approche positive et inclusive envers les femmes.

Alors que les pays de l’ancien Bloc de l’Est sont une région du globe où l’antisémitisme se métastase avec la montée de l’extrême-droite (comme en Pologne), l’individu ne saurait être accusé d’aucun travers antisémite « dans un pays affichant une histoire sombre dans sa relation avec la communauté juive. » Finalement, pour répondre à l’accusation selon laquelle tous les ennemis du locataire du Kremlin se font zigouiller, Mark Galeotti intitule l’un de ses chapitres « Les ennemis de Poutine ne meurent pas tous » (après tout, Alexei Navalny est toujours vivant), exposant que « les Russes ont plus de chances de succomber à des rivalités criminelles ou d’affaires qu’en raison de démêlés avec le régime. »

Cela n’est pas sans me rappeler mon séjour à Moscou, au cours duquel j’avais aperçu la voiture d’un banquier devant mon hôtel, gardé par un agent de sécurité (qui ressemblait davantage à un mercenaire) armé jusqu’aux dents et se tenant prêt à appuyer sur la gâchette de son AK-17. Toute personne s’intéressant de près ou de loin à l’histoire de la Russie sait que le climat de violence fait partie du tissu social et politique de ce pays depuis des siècles. Il n’est donc pas étonnant que Poutine ait revêtu l’armure publique d’une personnalité forte, puisque « si les gens croient que vous êtes puissants, vous êtes puissants. »

L’auteur attribue les crimes politiques (notamment l’assassinat de Boris Nemtsov) au climat qui s’est fait jour autour des cercles du pouvoir. Même si une commande n’est pas donnée directement, le message passe subtilement et les basses œuvres sont exécutées. Avec un humour noir, il observe que Poutine est un autocrate miséricordieux. Vous ne tomberez pas sous les balles d’un tueur si vous ne l’obligez pas à vous acheminer prématurément vers le Créateur. Ne franchissez donc pas la ligne. Je me questionne cependant à savoir si Poutine cautionne ce système d’emblée ou s’il ne fait que l’instrumentaliser pour demeurer au pouvoir. Je ne retiendrai pas mon souffle en attendant la réponse. C’est brutal et je suis à des années lumières d’être à l’aise avec les règlements de conflits à coups de pistolet ou d’attentats, mais c’est la réalité.

Cela dit, j’ai été étonné de lire que VVP (c’est par ses initiales que plusieurs désignent souvent le chef d’État russe) serait également un sentimental, mais j’aurais dû m’en douter puisque la personnalité très dominante du président russe masque assurément, comme chez tous les individus, des blessures que l’on tient à protéger derrières les barbelées d’une posture « macho ». Mais je ne veux pas jouer les psychologues amateurs.

L’intérêt du travail de Mark Galeotti repose sur le fait que Vladimir Poutine est assurément mal perçu et visiblement mal compris en occident. Depuis longtemps, je suis d’avis que le tsar actuel est une bien meilleure option pour plusieurs que ceux qui pourraient vouloir ou être appelés à le remplacer.

L’historien adresse donc une mise en garde à l’effet que « Toute interférence plus active ou agressive entrainerait probablement des réactions actives et agressives, accordant plus de pouvoir à ces ultranationalistes que Poutine est parvenu à contenir. Le personnage n’est ni un fanatique, ni un lunatique et une Russie vivant dans la stabilité est moins dangereuse que si elle évolue dans le chaos. »

On ne pourrait saurait donc en vouloir à ceux qui souhaitent que les faucons ne délogent pas l’aigle de son nid.

S’il est un défaut dont j’affublerais ce livre, c’est qu’il est malheureusement beaucoup trop court. J’aurais bien avalé plusieurs pages supplémentaires rédigées par cette plume renseignée et agréable.

_________

Mark Galeotti, We Need to Talk About Putin: How the West Gets Him Wrong, London, Ebury Press, 2019, 143 pages.